Brian Eno is MORE DARK THAN SHARK
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INTERVIEWS, REVIEWS & RELATED ARTICLES

Melody Maker FEBRUARY 23, 1989 - by Richard Mills

CROSS-WIRED

For the last two years, the beautiful church of St Peter's Vauxhall has been the unlikely setting for the Echoes From The Cross concerts highlighting a strikingly diverse selection of music. Never just a musical event, the shows have created a focus for the proposed Heritage Centre - a gallery and theatre.

Artist who have already appeared include John Foxx, Dead Can Dance, Roger Eno and Michael Brook; this year sees the strongest and most varied line-up yet, featuring the long-awaited premiere of a new work by Brian Eno on Friday, March 4. However, Eno will not be among the musicians playing. He explains:

"These pieces started life in my studio nearly two years ago as extensions of my On Land album. When I heard John Bonnar's performance of his Horizontal Retort, an idea occurred to me. I put the idea to John, 'Imagine you are an archeologist who has somehow been able to hear the music of a distant culture. You then have to make as faithful a rendition as possible without using any of the instruments with which it was originally played.' I am hoping that the result will be a music that neither John nor myself could have otherwise imagined."

Also appearing as the Cross will be Michael Brook, whose "Infinite Guitar" invention was used on U2's Joshua Tree album. Playing alone, we are promised "rhythmic, highly textured sounds reconciling the technological and the ethnic."

Completing the bill on the first evening are Dade Krama, African musicians playing ancestral African music.

On Saturday, March 5, the fare is no less varied. Hot Cinders, a seven-piece group featuring a seventy-year-old percussionist from Afghanistan, will be playing their unique hybrid of Pakistani and Western music championed by Charlie Gillett.

They will be joined that evening by The Happy End, who will be playing a specially written "fairly serious, mostly original" selection including Radium City, a composition conceived as a tribute to the factory women of Ottawa, Illinois, all of whom received high doses of radium and died at early ages from cancer.

This cheerful item will be preceded by Robert Lee, who returns with an orchestral ensemble.

Tickets are available in advance from The Parish centre, St Anselm's Vicarage, Kennington Road, London SE11 (01-735-3403).


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