Brian Eno is MORE DARK THAN SHARK
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"Craft is what enables you to be successful
when you're not inspired." - Brian Eno

The Blue Moment AUGUST 24, 2016 - by Richard Williams

DAVID ENTHOVEN: THE LAST GOODBYE

On my way to David Enthoven's funeral this morning, I walked from Sloane Square down the King's Road and paused at No 63A, where it all began. The weather was glorious: in the perfect sunshine, it was easy to drift back to the Chelsea of an imagined and sometimes real '60s.

David died in London last week, aged seventy-two, five days after being diagnosed with kidney cancer. Behind that door and up a flight of stairs, he and Johnny Gaydon, his schoolfriend and first business partner, set up EG Management in 1969, with King Crimson as their first clients. Marc Bolan, ELP and Roxy Music soon joined the roster. They were great days. (And here's the obituary I wrote for The Guardian.)

When I got to St Luke's, a large nineteenth century Anglican church just off the King's Road, it was already close to packed with people wanting to say farewell to an extraordinary man. As they lingered in the sunlit churchyard after the ceremony, the event had something of the qualities of an English garden party, which was just as it should have been.

Tim Clark, his friend and partner in IE:Music, his second management company, gave an address which stressed the life-enhancing qualities that made David special to every single member of the congregation. Robbie Williams, whose life and career David and Tim had salvaged and remade, sang Moon River - a lovely choice - accompanied by the acoustic guitar of Guy Chambers. Lucy Pullin and a choir sang Angels, which Williams and Chambers wrote after David and Tim had brought them together. Lamar led the singing of Jerusalem.

The congregation included Robert Fripp, the founder of King Crimson, and all five surviving members of Roxy Music from the sessions for the band's debut album in the summer of 1972: Brian Eno, Bryan Ferry, Andy Mackay, Phil Manzanera and Paul Thompson, who came down for the funeral from Newcastle, where he now plays the drums with Lindisfarne.

One of the morning's pleasures, over which the man in whose memory we were gathered would certainly have shared a chuckle, was the sight of Fripp, Eno and Ferry (so much history there, from Ferry's failed audition for King Crimson to Fripp and Eno's collaboration on No Pussyfooting and beyond) joining the singing of All Things Bright And Beautiful. You don't get that every day.


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