Brian Eno is MORE DARK THAN SHARK
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INTERVIEWS, REVIEWS & RELATED ARTICLES
"Craft is what enables you to be successful
when you're not inspired." - Brian Eno

Prog FEBRUARY 2014 - by Rob Hughes

LARAAJI: CELESTIAL MUSIC 1978-2011

Odds'n'sods from the new-age pioneer.

How's this for a career curve? Philadelphia-born Edward Gordon studies composition at university, decides to become a stand-up comedian, adopts Eastern mysticism, begins playing a customised electronic zither and ends up being discovered by Brian Eno while busking in New York. Known as Laraaji since he started recording in the late '70s, his best-known release was 1980's Ambient 3: Day Of Radiance, the third instalment in Eno's celebrated Ambient series. One of its key components, The Dance #3, forms part of Celestial Music, a two-CD collection of rarities and collaborations spanning the past three- and-a-bit decades. Disc two features astral highlights from his work with others (Bill Laswell, Michael Brook, Blues Control), as well as solo sound textures such as 2008's lovely Staccato. But it's Disc one that houses his more animated explorations. Unicorns In Paradise is as outre as its title suggests, recalling both Terry Riley and the blissful kosmische of Tangerine Dream or Harmonia. Vision Song Suite, meanwhile, is a hyperspace ballad of gorgeous proportions. Also out on All Saints are Essence/Universe and Two Sides Of Laraaji, but this set is a fine entry into a curious universe.


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